Big Bang

big bang

 

Big Bang was inspired by images from the Hubble Telescope. The cosmos beyond our known solar system has fascinated me all my life. It makes no sense to me that the universe is anything but benevolent, joyful and loving. I imagine that its constant expansion is an exuberant expression of love and self actualisation. My aim is to capture that exuberance in multi-media artworks through colour and texture. I also use flying hearts as meteorites and crystals.

Big Bang is an original 36 x 24 inch landscape on acid free box canvas, painted in acrylic with a variety of crystals, clay hearts also painted with acrylic and encrusted with shimmering Glamour Dust. The hearts’ ‘tails’ are created with foil.

 

Astronomers and cosmologists have been studying the ‘birth’ of our known universe for centuries and while ‘The Big Bang’ is the prevailing theory, we are still discovering more questions to be investigated.

In very simple terms the Big Bang theory says that 13.7 billion years ago our known universe was all compacted into one super-dense ball, which expanded and created a primordial cosmic soup that has become everything in the universe that we see around us – and the stuff we can’t yet see and haven’t yet studied or measured. The Big Bang was not an explosion of matter moving outward to fill an empty universe, but rather an expansion of space itself.

Significant progress in Big Bang cosmology have been made since the late 1990s as a result of advances in telescope technology as well as the analysis of data from satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. Cosmologists now have fairly precise and accurate measurements of many of the parameters of the Big Bang model, and we now know that the expansion of the universe is accelerating.

Just getting your head around some of the concepts of the Big Bang, let alone the maths, can be somewhat mind blowing. However, it is interesting to consider how we as microcosms of the universe can also be more expansive. Where in our life could we expand ourselves to create or inhabit new space, rather than wait for a space to expand into? It’s a subtle shift, but a significant one.

Big Bang was one of the first of my ‘Cosmos’ artworks. It is an example of my own expansion. I had only been painting a few months when I created this, playing with explosions of colour and materials in a way I hadn’t done before. It launched me into an artistic space I hadn’t even imagined, sparked the inspiration for my exhibitions and led to a whole new cosmic world of art and astronomy including scientific study and painting the Cosmos onto furniture and guitars! There might even be a book germinating too.

To purchase, or to make an appointment to view, contact tina@tinabettison.com or call 07778 014466

 

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